jueves, 22 de diciembre de 2016

NEEDN'T & DON'T NEED TO. What's the difference between them?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv317.shtml
  

There is also a difference in use when these verbs are used to describe present situations. We can use both needn't and don't need to to give permission to someone not to do something in the immediate future. We can also use need as a noun here:

You don't need to water the garden this evening. It's going to rain tonight. 
You needn't water the garden this evening. It's going to rain tonight. 
There's no need to water the garden this evening. It's going to rain tonight. 
You don't need to shout. It's a good line. I can hear you perfectly. 
You needn't shout. It's a good line. I can hear you perfectly.                                      
There's no need to shout. It's a good line. I can hear you perfectly.
 
However, when we are talking about general necessity, we normally use don't need to:
You don't need to pay for medical care in National Health Service hospitals.
You don't need to be rich to get into this golf club. You just need a handicap.

NEEDN'T HAVE & DIDN'T NEED TO. What's the difference between them?

 Both these forms are used to talk about past events, but there is sometimes a difference in use. When we say that someone needn't have done something, it means that they did it, but it was not necessary. Didn't need to is also sometimes used in this way:
You needn't have washed the dishes. I would've put them in the dishwasher. 
You didn't need to wash the dishes. I would've put them in the dishwasher. 
I didn't need to prepare all that food. They phoned to say they wouldn't be coming. 
I needn't have prepared all that food. They phoned to say they wouldn't be coming.
 But we also use didn't need to to say that something was not necessary under circumstances where it was not done:
The sun came out so we didn't need to take any rainwear on the trip.
We had plenty of petrol in the tank so I didn't need to fill up.
We didn't need to wait for long for them. They arrived just after us.
 

martes, 6 de diciembre de 2016

TEST 1: Reading and Use of English

Part 1: Multitasking children

Collocations:
0. damage verb
ADV. badly, seriously, severely The building was badly damaged by fire. | slightly | irreparably, permanently She may have damaged her health irreparably. 

7. increase verb
ADV. considerably, dramatically, enormously, greatly, significantly, substantially | slightly | gradually | rapidly, sharply, steeply | steadily | twofold, threefold, etc. Sales increased almost fourfold in this period.
VERB + INCREASE be expected to, be likely to Demand is expected to increase over the next decade.
PREP. by The budget has increased by more than a third in the last year. | from, in to increase in amount/number/price/size | to Last month the reward was increased from £20,000 to £40,000. | with Disability increases with age.


 

Christmas carols for everyone *.*


domingo, 25 de septiembre de 2016

A lovely 'All-about-me Book' of paper selfies


https://es.pinterest.com/pin/413768284492274709/

Some ideas:
                                                   Minecraft avatars

                                                    
                                                   Other ways:

martes, 31 de mayo de 2016

Animated films


Reading: What comes NATURALLY



Irving Berli

Doin' What Comes Natur'lly Lyrics

Folks are dumb where I come from
They ain't had any learnin'
Still they're happy as can be

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

Folks like us could never fuss
With schools and books and learnin'
Still we've gone from A to Z

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

You don't have to know how to read or write
When you're out with a feller in the pale moonlight
You don't have to look in a book to find
What he thinks of the moon or what is on his mind

That comes naturally
That comes naturally

My uncle out in Texas
Can't even write his name
He signs his checks with X's
But they cash 'em just the same

If you saw my pa and ma
You'd no they had no learnin'
Still they raised a family

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

Uncle Jed has never read
An almanac on drinkin'
Still he's always on a spree (parranda)

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

Sister Sal who's mus-i-cal
Has never had a lesson
Still she's learned to sing off-key (desafinado)

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

You don't have to go to a private school
Not to pick up a penny by a stubborn mule
You don't have to have a professor's dome (figurative: head)
Not to go for the honey when the bee's at home

That comes naturally
That comes naturally

My tiny baby brother
Who's never read a book
Knows one sex from the other
All he had to do was look

Grandpa Bill is on the hill
With someone he just married
There he is at ninety-three

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

Sister Lou ain't got a sou figurative: a samll amount of money- coloquial : céntimo)

Although she goes out shoppin'
She gets all her stockings free

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

Cousin Nell can't add or spell
But she left school with honors
She got every known degree

For doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

You don't have to come from a great big town
Not to clean out a stable in an evening gown
You don't have to mix with the Vanderbilt's
Not to take off your panties when you're wearing kilts (schoolgirl's pleated skirt)

That comes naturally
That comes naturally

My mother's cousin Carrie
Won't ever change her name
She doesn't want to marry
And her children feel the same

Sister Rose has lots of beaus (French- boyfriends)
Although we have no parlor (US- reception room: salòn)
She does fine behind a tree

Doin' what comes naturally
Doin' what comes naturally

miércoles, 25 de mayo de 2016

Reading: The trouble with modern audiences

Muhler's Sixth Symphony

bob your head

phrase: to move your head down and then back up again in a short quick movement as a way of greeting someone or showing agreement or respect

avail noun     avail pronunciation in British English
/əˈveɪl/

phrase: to/of no avail: formal- without getting the effect you wanted or intended. e.g.His words of encouragement were to no avail.

martes, 10 de mayo de 2016

Vocabulary: Noise and sound

cry - noun [countable]     cry pronunciation in British English
/kraɪ/

Sound effect a loud expression of emotion, especially pain, fear, or happiness
cry of:a cry of pain/anguish
give/utter a cry:The horses gave a cry of alarm.

shriek - noun [countable]     shriek pronunciation in British English
/ʃriːk/

Sound effect a sound of someone shrieking

scream - noun [countable]     scream pronunciation in British English
/skriːm/

Sound effect a loud high noise that you make because you are hurt, frightened, or excited
He heard screams coming from the hotel lobby.
give/let out a scream:She gave a little scream of delight.

groan -noun [countable]     groan pronunciation in British English
/ɡrəʊn/

Sound effect a long low sound that a person makes, especially when they are in pain or unhappy

squeak - verb     squeak pronunciation in British English
/skwiːk/Word Forms

  1. [intransitive]Sound effect to make a short, high noise
    Synonyms and related words 
2. [intransitive/transitive] to speak in a high voice, especially because you are upset or excited

growl -verb     growl pronunciation in British English
/ɡraʊl/

Word Forms
  1. 1
    [intransitive]Sound effect if an animal growls, it makes a frightening or unfriendly low noise
    The dog growled at me.
    Synonyms and related words 
  2. [intransitive]Sound effect if thunder or a machine growls, it makes a low unpleasant noise
    Synonyms and related words 
  3. [intransitive/transitive] to say something in an unfriendly and angry way
    ‘I couldn’t care less,’ Ben growled.
    Synonyms and related words